Edible landscaping is a way of incorporating food plants in a visually appealing way to create a landscape that is multi-functional and provides returns on your investment of plant material, water, fertilizer and time. Gardeners in Cherokee County might consider incorporating edibles for a number of reasons:

♦ Sun Exposure — Ornamental beds are often the best or only location in homeowners yards that receive sufficient (at least 6 hours) sunlight for vegetables and herbs.

♦ Convenience — Ornamental plantings are often close to the areas of the yard that we use most so if your edibles are incorporated you may find using fresh ingredients easier. It is also easier to stay on top of weeds and insect issues if you are visiting the area more frequently.

♦ Reduced Grocery Costs — Many edibles, especially herbs can add to your monthly food bills if you buy from grocery stores.

♦ Improved Health — Fresh vegetables are a great source of vitamins and minerals when properly prepared and gardening can be great exercise.

The key to creating a visually appealing edible landscape is the artful combination of annuals and perennials. Most edibles are going to substitute for the use of annuals but there are some options for shrubs, vines, and small trees.

Annual Color: Rainbow chard, purple mustard, kale and lettuce can all add dramatic effect with their foliage and mid-rib color variation. Calendula and nasturtium are both edible flowers that can add color to salads and nasturtium leaves can be used in pesto. Basil comes in many varieties and colors, consider the dwarf boxwood variety to create more formal lines. Taller plants like corn or okra can be planted at the back of a garden to create height and screening.

Ground Cover: Thyme, oregano and savory make great evergreen ground covers. Goldberg Golden Purslane and New Zealand spinach (or tetragonia) have succulent leaves and a sprawling growth habit. Strawberries will also sprawl out and cover an area as well.

Shrubs and Perennials: Blueberries have become a major cash crop in Georgia but are beautiful plants that have spring flowers, summer fruit and fall color. Pomegranate, figs and jujubes are all great plants that grow well in our area. American Hazelnut is deciduous shrub/small tree that grows well in our area. Rosemary is a great addition with its evergreen, needle-like foliage. Garden sage is also evergreen and has a wonderful softness to its leaves like a ‘dusty miller’ or lambs ear.

Edible Vines and Climbers: Structures like arbors and trellises are a great way to add interest in your garden and there are some great substitutions for the climbing rose or clematis you may have in mind. Muscadines are extremely hardy and have few problems compared to many of the bunch grapes. If you want an annual plant that is easier to control you can consider Malabar spinach, which has delicious greens and beautiful red stems. There are all types of beans that will grow rapidly and cover a structure. The Chinese Red Noodle bean will produce one- to three-foot-long burgundy beans that will amaze.

Trees: Apples are well suited for Cherokee County and can maximize a small space with a few espaliered trees. The serviceberry (juneberry) is a great alternative to a crapemyrtle and the birds will love it. Mulberries are delicious and very easy to grow; just make sure they are planted in an area where you won’t mind a mess. Asian pears and Asian persimmons are some of the easiest fruit trees to grow in terms of pest resistance.

Note: If you are looking for some great berry bushes or fruit trees to incorporate into your landscape, the Extension office has organized a pre-order fruit plant sale through March 13. Proceeds will go to establish a new educational garden and orchard project in Veterans Park.

The order form and plant descriptions can be found online here: t.uga.edu/5Hp.

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Joshua Fuder, Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent, UGA Cherokee County Extension office. If you have any questions, call 770-721-7830 or visit my blog @ blog.extension.uga.edu/cherokee. For upcoming seminars, follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ cherokeemastergardeners or on our website at cherokeemastergardenersinc.wildapricot.org.

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