CFB

Canton’s Kelly and Chase Fuller welcomed their first child, Declan Douglas Fuller, who was Cherokee County’s first baby of 2019.

Over its most recent fiscal year, an average of almost five babies per day were delivered at Northside Hospital Cherokee, spokeswoman Katherine Watson said Wednesday. 

On Tuesday, Declan Douglas Fuller arrived at 1 a.m. as Cherokee County’s first baby of 2019.

“It is pretty cool to have the first baby. I didn’t think we would make it to 2019,” said Declan’s mother, Kelly Fuller, whose due date was Dec. 22.

Declan weighed in at 8 pounds, 8 ounces, and his father Chase Fuller noted his son’s birthday would be memorable.

“It’s exciting for his birthday to be 1/1 or the New Year and born at 1 a.m. That will always be easy to remember,” Chase Fuller said.

The Fullers are from Canton.

While the hospital saw more than 1,700 births in its fiscal year, the first one of the calendar year is always special.

In 2018, Cherokee County welcomed its first baby Judah Lincoln Teague, also born at Northside Hospital Cherokee.

Weighing exactly eight pounds, the boy was born at about 7:02 a.m. to parents Moriah and Josiah Teague of Kennesaw. The young parents, 22 years old, grew up in Woodstock and were expecting their son around the holidays with a due date of New Year’s Day. Although he was a few hours late, after a nine-hour delivery he arrived in time to be the first born at the hospital.

As metropolitan Atlanta’s fastest growing county with more than a quarter million residents, Northside Hospital Cherokee is anticipating many more births in the coming years.

Steve Aslinger, director of planning and facilities, revealed in November that Northside Hospital Cherokee will be adding two floors to its Women’s Center, which is where babies are born locally. The project is expected to begin construction this year and be completed sometime in 2020.

The United Nations Children’s Fund said that there were expected to be 11,000 babies born in the United States on New Years Day, about 400 of them in Georgia.

“American babies born in 2019 are estimated to live until 2099, but we want to see a world where all babies can live the same long and healthy lives,” said Caryl M. Stern, President and CEO of UNICEF USA. “Being born on a celebrated day like New Year’s Day is random chance. But so is where you are born, and New Year’s Day is a reminder of how fortunate we are here in the United States, and what more we can do to save the lives of newborns everywhere.”

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